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I'm amazed at how superior your vanilla is!
- Des, The Grommet

LEARN ABOUT VANILLA

About Vanilla is dedicated to everyone who loves vanilla and its seductive flavor and aroma. Considering how popular vanilla is and how it's in so many products, it's surprising how little most of us know about it.

The Queen hopes you'll enjoy the articles included here. If you are interested in food history or where your favorite foods come from, consider purchasing, Vanilla: The Cultural History of the World's Favorite Flavor and Fragrance, available in our store. The Queen has the key to the history of vanilla from Mesoamerica to the moment and she's honored to share the story with the world!

Vanilla Facts

Only two percent of “vanilla” foods, beverages, medicines, perfumes, bodycare, and industrial products used worldwide actually contain pure vanilla.

Will the 2016 Vanilla Crop Bring Lower Prices?

 

1-Bahrat 4 vines on jatrophaA week ago an interim report was released by a European company that has been in the vanilla business for more than 100 years and is known for their honest and reliable industry assessments. The report was released far earlier than usual because of the current chaotic conditions on the ground in Madagascar. There will be another report released in the fourth quarter of this year with a clearer picture of what to anticipate as the crop comes to market. This is a brief synopsis of the interim report to give readers a sense of what is occurring.

Why is vanilla so expensive?

Have you noticed that the cost of cookies, cakes and ice creams have gone up? Most  desserts use  vanilla, and vanilla prices are skyrocketing in 2013. Could that be it? And why is vanilla getting so expensive? The answer may surprise you. Read on.

As vanilla prices rise, so do baked goods. Picture credit: http://experimentalgastronomy.wordpress.com

As vanilla prices rise, so do baked goods.  Or do they? Picture credit: The Experimental Gastronomy

Like everything else, the cost of vanilla is affected by supply and demand, and today the vanilla supply is down – WAY DOWN.

Tropical farmers who grow coffee, cacao, vanilla, sugar and a few other crops, constantly face fluctuating prices for their crops due to supply and demand. And because vanilla is by far the smallest of the tropical luxury crops, the vanilla industry faces

What’s the best vanilla extract?

So many choices. So many prices.
Are they all the same? What is the best vanilla?

What's the best vanilla extract?Have you ever stared at the vanilla extracts on the store shelves and wondered which  is the best vanilla extract to buy? In some respects, choosing a vanilla extract is like selecting a fine wine. How do you know which one to buy?

Read on for an insider’s view of vanilla extract, how to choose what’s best for you and why high-quality vanilla makes a world of difference in flavor.

The best quality vanilla extracts come with a price

The simple answer for what is the best vanilla extract boils down to price. Good vanilla is not cheap. And because it is so pricey (it’s the world’s most labor-intensive crop), customers are often put off by sticker-shock. 

Most supermarket vanilla extracts are mediocre

So stores try their best to buy the cheapest extracts they can find. That means most supermarket vanilla extracts — both brand name and store brands — while they may be pure vanilla, are usually of mediocre quality in comparison to the really fine quality extracts that are available elsewhere. This is also true in the big-box stores where bulk vanilla is fairly inexpensive.

Sex, Love and the Vanilla Bean

 

Chocolate-VanillaAh, the delicious allure of romance, the intensity of a new infatuation, the rapture of falling in love. Pretty powerful stuff, the pleasures and passions of romance and love. Spring, summer, fall and winter, we’re in love with the idea of love. The perfume industry thrives on our desire to lure and captivate the object of our affection and vanilla performs an important role in the drama. While the romantic sunset at the seashore and that special song may make us swoon, taste and smell are big players in the game of love.

So, how does vanilla steal the show? Is it an aphrodisiac? Will it enhance our love lives? Let’s explore a few of the myths and facts surrounding the illustrious bean to see if, indeed, there are seeds of amorous evidence inside those sleek black pods.

Does Mexico Still Produce Vanilla?

1-Mexico festival 2

Beautiful, exotic Mexico. Warm weather, gorgeous beaches, a rich and varied culture, delicious food, and…the birthplace of vanilla. Some of you may be thinking, “Well, duh! I buy my fabulous vanilla there every time I visit.” In which case you should take a moment to read about your fabulous vanilla here. Otherwise, here is a brief overview of the history of the Mexican vanilla industry and why Mexican vanilla beans are difficult to come by today.

Facts and FAQs About Vanilla

A brief encyclopedia of facts you might like to know about vanilla

1-Flor vainilla 3 

What is Vanilla?

Vanilla is a member of the orchid family, the largest and oldest family of flowering plants in the world. Vanilla is the only edible fruit of the entire orchid family, which includes roughly 25,000 orchid varieties and over 10,000 hybrids. It grows best in the moist, tropical regions of the world 15-1/2 degrees to the north and south of the Equator.

Cheap vanilla? Hold onto your wallet!

1-Flor vainilla 5Have you noticed that vanilla prices have been creeping up for the last two years?

Well, now vanilla has become really expensive!

Frustrating? You bet, especially as we enter the autumn baking season and the holidays.

So why are the prices climbing and where can you find cheap vanilla? It turns out the answer is complicated. 

Think shortage – One cyclone can wipe out a third of the year’s vanilla crop overnight!

Nearly everything we purchase is priced according to supply and demand, and this is especially true with food. Whereas clothing, washing machines, cars and other man-made goods typically are pretty consistently available, agricultural products are subject to weather patterns, pests, pathogens and even human manipulation.

Because we live in a global economy, if there’s a wheat shortage due to bad weather in our Midwest, our government can buy wheat from another country. Prices will go up, but bakeries won’t shut down and flour will still be on market shelves. The same is true with last year’s egg shortage. Avian Flu decimated many commercial egg producing facilities but only in some regions. We could still find eggs at the market, but we  paid dearly for them. Now, almost a year later, there is a glut of eggs again.

What is vanilla paste?

We’ll tell you, plus share with you our favorite vanilla paste recipes!

In 1967 I saw my first vanilla bean. I was already 24 years old. This shouldn’t sound remarkable but it actually is because even finding a vanilla bean in San Francisco in 1967  took some effort.

I had a friend who had lived in Italy and traveled a great deal in Europe. He and I were in a coffee and spice store and he bought me a vanilla bean. I was enchanted by the aroma but completely puzzled about how to use it. He told me to put it in my container of coffee beans and the vanilla would perfume the coffee. So I did. It wasn’t until 1985 that I learned how to use vanilla beans in any other way. Once I knew how, I never stopped using them but I’ve expanded my vanilla repertoire considerably since then.

There’s a reason why I share this story. Before the Food Network became so popular, most people had no clue about how to use vanilla beans. Probably had never seen them either.  Once they became a regular on the Network,  everyone had  to use vanilla beans in their baking and dessert making.

Frequently Asked Questions About Vanilla

1-Flor vainilla 5

Here are some of the questions  that I’m most frequently asked about vanilla. These are the short answers.  If you have questions about specific products, be sure to read the descriptions posted with each  product. If you are interested in more in-depth information about vanilla, check out the Queen’s book, Vanilla: The Cultural History of the Worlds Favorite Flavor and Fragrance. Any serious cook or baker as well as anyone interested in the history of food, will find this book fascinating. You can get it here.

Q. What is vanilla?
A. Vanilla is the only edible fruit of the orchid family, which is the largest family of

Vanilla in Savory Foods — Really??

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Really.  In 1985, when I wrote The Vanilla Cookbook, my editors asked me what vanilla could be used in besides ice cream, dessert and beverages. Quite honestly, the idea had never crossed my mind. However, they threw down the gauntlet next to my half-written  manuscript.  Experiment or give back the advance — what would you do?

Is Fair Trade vanilla really fair?

Did you know there is a dark side to fair trade vanilla?

According to the World Fair Trade Organization, the definition of Fair Trade is as follows:

“Fair Trade is a trading partnership, based on dialogue, transparency and respect, that seek greater equity in international trade. It contributes to sustainable development by offering better trading conditions to, and securing the rights of, marginalized producers and workers – especially in the South. Fair Trade Organizations, backed by  consumers, are engaged actively  in supporting producers,  awareness  raising  and  in  campaigning  for  changes  in  the  rules  and  practice  of conventional international trade.”

What’s not to like about this? Fairness for farmers, which helps them and their families to thrive as well as to continue to produce the foods, spices and other ingredients thatwe love and use regularly.

What’s the advantage of buying vanilla extract and vanilla beans in bulk?

For a flavor that  everyone loves (some people love it more than chocolate!), why is vanilla extract  sold in little bottles or one or two bean tubes?  Seems counter-intuitive, doesn’t it?  Then again, vanilla beans are so expensive, why would I want to buy them in bulk?

Good questions that we don’t usually consider when we’re buying spices and flavors. Nearly all are sold in small quantities except online and in specialty stores. We’re essentially programmed to think small even though it’s all about big flavor.

While it does make sense to purchase dried herbs in small amounts unless we’re using them daily, when it comes to vanilla beans

Here We Go Again: Another Vanilla Crisis Looms!

Another vanilla crisis? Didn’t we just have one?

Yep, we sure did and the price of a little bottle of vanilla was ridiculously high! So how can this be happening again? Sadly, very easily.  Worse, it shouldn’t have to happen!

In the commodity world the operative words are  supply and demand. When it comes to anything grown in the tropics, most especially luxury crops like coffee, chocolate, vanilla and sugar, supply and demand are

Worldwide Farmers Exchange

In the summer of 2007 I  met Chris Barden of Worldwide Farmers Exchange (WFE), a program operating out of Berkeley California.  We were attending an event at Santa Clara University.  Over lunch together, I learned that Chris was interested in finding women farmers to participate in their exchange program.  I was interested in WFE as many of the farmers I have met via my site want very much to gain new skills sets to assist them in their countries of origin.  I’m sharing information about the Worldwide Farmers Exchange as one possible option for those of you interested in learning new agricultural work that could benefit you and your country as well as to encourage those readers who have farms to

Vanilla Oleoresin and Absolute

Want a natural vanilla fragrance? Unfortunately, there isn’t a cheap solution.  Extracts contain too much water and ground vanilla powder acts more like an exfoliant than a fragrance.  The two options are vanilla oleoresin and vanilla absolute.

Vanilla oleoresin is a semi-solid concentrate made by removing the solvent from vanilla extract. A solution of isopropanol is frequently used instead of ethanol for the preparation. Some flavor and aroma is lost during removal of the solvent, but the essential oils remain. Vanilla oleoresin is used in non-food products. Unfortunately, it isn’t

Ground Vanilla Beans, Vanilla Powder and Vanilla Paste

In addition to the more traditional vanilla beans and extracts, there are newer alternatives for cooking, baking and flavoring beverages.  Ground vanilla beans (also called ground vanilla powder), vanilla powder and vanilla paste are flavorful, useful options.  Read on to learn more.

 

Vanilla Powder

There are several types of vanilla powders commercially available. Some are made from sucrose that has been ribbon-sprayed with vanilla extract, and some are a dextrose-vanilla extract mix. They work well in  beverages if you want a slightly sweet product that dissolves easily. You can also mix them into powdered or granulated sugar for a vanilla-flavored sugar or use vanilla powder in hot chocolate mix or making packaged cake, pancake or biscuit mixes. Note: Most of the vanilla powders from Europe are actually synthetic. Check the ingredients list to see if it’s natural or not.  Some may also contain

Imitation (Synthetic) Vanilla

Imitation vanilla comes from synthetic vanillin, which mimics the flavor of natural vanillin, one of the components that gives vanilla its extraordinary bouquet.The first synthetics were made in Germany in the 1870s as pure vanilla was so expensive that only the wealthy could afford it. It was first made from coniferin, the glucoside that makes some pines smell a little like vanilla. In the 1890s a French chemist created a synthetic from euganol, found in cloves. The two most common sources for synthetic vanillin have been Lignin Vanillin, a by-product of the paper industry, which has been chemically treated to resemble the taste of pure vanilla extract, and Ethyl Vanillin, which is a coal-tar derivative and frequently far stronger than either Lignin Vanillin or pure vanilla.

Tahitian Vanilla Extract

If you have never tried Tahitian vanilla but you like fruity, floral, flavors and aromas, treat yourself to this marvellous extract!

Tahitian vanilla (Vanilla tahitensis) did not originate in Tahiti.  It appears that Spaniards brought vanilla plant stock to the southern Philippines, one of its colonial outposts.  Vanilla planifolia was crossed with Vanilla odorata in the sixteenth or seventeenth centuries. This particular plant stock was taken to Tahiti in the early 1800s and planted in Papeete. Missionaries saw the vanilla growing there in the early 1900s and encouraged the Tahitians to grow vanilla for resale.  The original stock has been hybridized, creating at least five different varieties of Tahitian vanilla.  Unfortunately, not many Tahitians are now growing it, and as Tahiti is a French country and trades in euros, Tahitian vanilla is quite expensive.

Tahitian vanilla is classified as a distinct species as it’s considerably different in appearance and flavor from Bourbon vanilla. It is sweeter and fruitier and has less natural vanillin than Bourbon and Mexican vanilla. It contains anis aldehydes, which gives it a more cherry-like, licorice, or raisiny taste. It has a very floral fragrance, the bean is fatter and moister than Bourbon vanilla, and contains fewer seeds inside its pod.

Madagascar and Bourbon Vanilla Extract

Madagascar and Bourbon vanilla are actually the same.  I’ll explain:

Vanilla planifolia, is the species of vanilla most commonly used in extracts. Vanilla planifolia stock originated in Mexico, vanilla’s birthplace, but cuttings were taken to other tropical countries beginning in the 1700s. In the 1800s, the French developed large plantations on Reunion, known then as the Ile de Bourbon, which is how the name Bourbon came into being. Although vanilla extract is high in alcohol content, it is not made from Bourbon whiskey.

Originally the term Bourbon referred to vanilla beans grown anywhere in the Indian Ocean region. As Vanilla Planifolia was planted in other countries, the name followed along.  As a result, Bourbon vanilla may or may not be from Madagascar, though increasingly vanilla beans are referred to by region rather than by this generic name.

Pure Mexican Vanilla

Vanilla Planifolia is the variety of vanilla plant that has fueled the world’s desire for our favorite flavor and fragrance.  It grows naturally in the tropical areas of Mexico, Central America and northern South America as well as in the Caribbean.

Until the twentieth century, all the vanilla that came into the United States came from Mexico.  Because Mexico is the birthplace of vanilla, we consumers assume that it must sell the best extracts.  In fact, it doesn’t!  Nearly all of the extracts made and sold in Mexico or in Mexican markets in the US are imitation. Pay no attention to the labels as label laws are not enforced in Mexico.  It’s imitation vanilla with potentially dangerous ingredients.  If you want pure Mexican vanilla extract, buy it in the U.S. from reputable dealers.

Why do our customers love Rain's Choice vanilla?

  • You get MORE FLAVOR because we use 20% more beans in our extracts than is required by law!
  • 99% of all vanilla products are imitation. Ours are 100% PURE!
  • We carefully choose all products to assure best QUALITY & FLAVOR!
  • Our farmers are paid a FAIR PRICE.
  • Our vanilla beans are SUSTAINABLY grown.
  • Everything we sell is ORGANICALLY grown.
  • Your purchase here supports our HUMANITARIAN efforts.

Thank you for supporting The Vanilla Company and our farmers! BUY HERE now.

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